Novena to La Santa Muerte: Day 3

I dreamt of La Santa Muerte again last night, the second time this week (the first being Monday night). It’s pretty obvious to me that She’s keen on my devotion to Her and these dreams are cosmic green lights/Her bony “thumbs up” signals in response to my petitions in my prayers as well as signs of encouragement for me to deepen my devotion to Her. With a profoundly grateful heart, I humbly offer to my blog readers (a huge shout-out of Welkom! to all my new Dutch readers, by the way!) the prayers to be said on Day 3 of the Novena to La Santa Muerte. Continue reading

The 22nd Annual FOI Chicago Goddess Convention: Going Forth by Day

You know you’ve been investing a lot of energy in public Pagan rituals when it takes you an entire week to replenish yourself! That’s always a delicate balance to walk: acts of service to your Powers and your city’s spiritual community while ensuring that your own personal reserves of energy don’t get depleted. And when you add the effects of a full moon total lunar eclipse in the mix, it goes without saying that you’re going to be living in what the ancient Chinese proverb refers to as “interesting times”!

Yet it was all well and good last weekend when the 22nd Annual Fellowship of Isis (FOI) Chicago Goddess Convention held sway in the city! The time-honored tradition of FOI clergy and friends/members of the Chicago Pagan community at large and representatives of other groups and traditions/Kemetic devotees/and curious seekers gathering together for a weekend of exchanging ideas, partaking of public ritual, celebrating, and welcoming the energies of transformation is alive and well.

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The 5th and Final Epagomenal Day: Happy Birthday, Nephthys!

What an amazingly auspicious day this is, one with extremely potent energies perfect for channeling into magico-religious rituals such as today’s Polytheist Day of Protest against Daesh, as well as for celebrating the Eve of the Egyptian New Year! And let’s not forget that it’s also Lughnasad weekend for those who celebrate the Feast of the Celtic God of the Long Arm (technically, Lughnasad commemorates the God’s Foster Mother, Tailtiu, but I digress), and thousands of miles away, hundreds of polytheists are convening in Washington State for the Many Gods West conference.

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The 2nd Epagomenal Day: The Birthday of Heru-Ur (Horus the Elder)

According to the nineteenth-century Egyptologist E.A. Wallis Budge, the hawk was probably the first animal that was worshiped throughout ancient Egypt (The Gods of the Egyptians, Vol. 1, Ch. XV). When you consider that along with the polytheistic cultic focus of what the Egyptians called the Njwty, the “local God”, it helps make the discovery of the profusion of Horus Gods in ancient Egyptian religion a little less baffling. Continue reading

Ancient Egyptian Ritual Magic: The Care & Feeding of a God

In ancient Egypt, magic and religion were indivisible. Priests were magicians and magicians, priests. Hekau was a general term for anyone who used magic, but the “Hekau of the House of Life” were probably specialists in ritual magic who served as the highest rank of temple clergy. Classical writers (Plutarch, Apuleius) refer to the daily ritual performed in Egyptian temples to animate divine statues as an exalted form of magic. This ritual was comprised of daily service for the temple’s chief Deity, in which Its ba, or manifestation, through the statue was purified, fed, clothed and praised. Continue reading

Prayer to Sedna

I am so incredibly excited! Galina Krasskova, a Heathen author and spirit worker whose work I’ve admired for years, personally contacted me today, asking me if I’d be interested in writing the prayer to accompany stunning imagery for a prayer card of the Inuit goddess Sedna! Galina has been producing Pagan prayer cards depicting various artists’ lovely renditions of Deity images from different cultural pantheons–and Sedna is up next for production! Galina informed me that her partner told her about my devotion to Sedna–my deepest thanks to you, Sannion!–and of course I immediately replied that I would be honored to compose the printed prayer (below) in honor of the Sea Woman; it’s going to be published under my legal name.

"Sedna" by the late Susan Seddon Boulet. This is not the image going on the prayer card Galina is producing; it is one of my personal favorites, however.

“Sedna” by the late Susan Seddon Boulet. This is not the image going on the prayer card Galina is producing; it is one of my personal favorites, however.

Sedna, Mother of Plenty, my thanks to You for granting me this opportunity to share my devotion! I’m so happy I’m squealing like a narwhal!

 

Prayer to Sedna

Sedna, I honor You

I welcome You, I give You thanks

 

Praise to the Sea Woman, swiftly advancing, roaring

Uinigumasuittuq the Tormented

Survivor of treachery

Your severed fingers birthed new beings

O Nerrivik, Mother of Plenty

Sustenance for The People in exchange for observing Your pittailiniq (taboos)

 

But when the balance is broken, O One Who Halts Harpoons in Mid-Flight,

You rightly gather up Your children

And they sigh with relief

Not being made food for fools, You shelter them in Adlivun

As our sins choke the ocean with grief

 

Ravenous Sedna, Bringer of Hunger, harvest my whispered prayer:

Teach me to free You from the nets that suffocate—from the paralyzing

Plastic bags of past deeds deserving of punishment

May I bring You comfort, soothe Your flippers when they ache

And disentangle Your long, black hair, thereby dissolving strands of Memory

Until all that is known is the sea

 

Dread Goddess Sedna, have mercy on me

 

Sedna, I honor You

I welcome You, I give You thanks

Wight Power: Cultivating Right Relationship with Land Spirits

Winter is finally starting to lose its vise grip here in The Chi. Daytime temps have been hovering in the 40s and 50s since Sunday, tolling a death knell for the mounds of snow. It’s actually possible to see patches of grass on peoples’ front lawns and in public parks once again, and the faintest buds are beginning to poke through the tips of tree branches. And so last night, for the first time in months, my Bodacious Beau™ Dan and I went out for a leisurely stroll in our local cemetery. That unmistakable angle of the almost-spring sun receding behind adjacent rooftops in the west just before it plunges into its deep, egg-yolk hue at sunset warmed both of our hearts immensely. Sparrows, robins, and turtle doves warbled and cooed from the neighboring trees. Indeed, all of nature seemed to be ringing out a symphony of joy, and I felt delighted to be unhindered in my ability to leave offerings for the spirits of the land and our Dunning neighborhood’s dead. I clutched my slices of homemade banana nut bread (the Mother Squirrel–I’ve named her Ratatosk as a nod to Norse mythology–residing in the Hel-Tree in the cemetery would surely be pleased!) to my chest and Dan and I grinned at each other as we traipsed our way through the soggy cemetery grounds. Continue reading