Novena to La Santa Muerte: Day 2

For the second day of the Novena to La Santa Muerte, which should be a Wednesday, study how the white three-day candle you lit the previous day is burning. Is the glass clear or smoky at its top edges? That can indicate Divine favor or the withholding of it (or challenges to the manifestation of your prayers). How is the flame behaving? If it’s active, flickering and making little crackling sounds, La Santísima is busy at work on your behalf. A slow but steady burn is fine too.

Dump out the stale water in Her clear glass from the previous day and offer fresh water, same thing with the tequila. If the bolilo bread roll has hardened overnight, swap it out with a fresh one. (Never throw bread in the garbage; I always crumble mine up and feed it to birds.) Cookies and candies from the previous day are still good to retain on the altar, as are the flowers (tip: chrysanthemums are traditional flowers for the dead in Mexican culture and they’re hardy and long-lasting, thus they’re ideal to offer to La Santa Muerte).

The second day of the Novena introduces a prayer that is illustrative of the “command and control” magic that is a staple of La Santa Muerte’s cultus. If someone has wronged you, or if a lover’s commitment to you seems dubious, feel free to add three drops of either Holy Death oil, Adam & Eve oil, or Do As I Say oil to recalibrate any imbalance. Petitions to redress injustice are best addressed to La Santa Muerte Verde (the green-robed La Santísima).

 

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Novena to La Santa Muerte: Day 1

In the Roman Catholic Church, November is the traditional month for praying the Novena–a nine-day prayer devoted to the Holy Mother or to a saint. Given that the majority of La Santa Muerte’s devotees consider themselves practicing Catholics, it’s not surprising in the least that the Novena format has been adapted for Her worship. Continue reading